Glyphosate Poisoning: Blockchain Used in Tracing Cancer Causing Chemical

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Food Safety: Blockchain Used in Tracing Cancer Causing Chemical
A US based company says it has developed a blockchain-based glyphosate testing solution that would enable consumers make better informed choices about the presence of allergens and gluten in their food and agricultural supply. Photo Credit: absolute staffers

While it may often seem like blockchain technology has little else to offer beside bitcoin and thousands of other cryptocurrencies, the technology is in fact much more than just digital money.

Blockchain’s public distributed ledger has other applications in commerce, law, healthcare and security. California-based food safety firm ZEGO is one of such firms using the technology outside of cryptocurrency.

The firm recently announced in a statement released on August 16 that it is using blockchain to test products for residue of a deadly chemical tied to a recent $289 million Monsanto lawsuit.

Monsanto, a German owned agro-chemical company was fined $289 million in damages after a U.S. court last week ruled in favor of a plaintiff’s claims that the company’s use of a herbicide containing glyphosate had caused his cancer.

The ruling has not come without controversies as experts and members of the public alike continue to debate the verdict and Monsanto’s culpability or otherwise.

According to ZEGO, it has developed a blockchain-based glyphosate testing solution that would enable consumers make better informed choices about the presence of allergens and gluten in their food and agricultural supply. It said further that it has submitted its patent to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).

ZEGO, offers that the blockchain test can also be used to verify claims of organic and non-GMO certifications in groceries or farm supplies. According to the company, “Most…companies do not test for glyphosate, even though numerous studies have measured surprisingly high amounts of it in some packaged [and] even organic foods.”

But in addition to testing for harmful chemicals, blockchain technology has also found other uses in fine art. In June, DigitalCoinNews reported that an iconic art piece by famous New York artist Andy Warhol would be auctioned on blockchain after the price was determined with an ethereum smart contract.